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Scapegoat Cities

A human understanding of how the Japanese-American internment happened. 

And Your Little Dog Too

And Your Little Dog Too

 

In 1948, Congress passed the Japanese Evacuation Claims Act.  It allowed Japanese Americans to file for claims for compensation from the federal government for the losses they had suffered as a consequence of being forced from their homes.

Sounds good.  But don't get your hopes up.

As you listen to this episode, keep this fact in mind: in order for a person to count as Jewish under the Nazi Nuremberg Laws of 1935, at least two of her grandparents had to have been Jewish.  And in some circumstances even two didn't suffice and a person had to have three.

This may seem kind of random, but it's not.  Listen and you'll understand why.

A pomeranian.  (Not Tiz.)

A pomeranian.  (Not Tiz.)

This is the photo that the Downs submitted to document that they'd owned the car they were claiming for.  It's the car on the left, behind Eunice Down's little brother.

This is the photo that the Downs submitted to document that they'd owned the car they were claiming for.  It's the car on the left, behind Eunice Down's little brother.

 

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Music in this episode: "Frame of Mind" by Erik Haddad; "Trust," "Foreigner," "The Wrong Way," "Trap," and "Books" by Jazzhar, "Don't Fence Me In" performed by Roy Rogers.

 

Nisei: "No Way"

Nisei: "No Way"